Author: Melissa Marr

Audio review: Wicked Lovely by Melissa Marr

Posted October 6, 2016 by Anne in Book Review | | 5 Comments

Audio review: Wicked Lovely by Melissa MarrWicked Lovely by Melissa Marr
Series: Wicked Lovely #1
Narrator: Alyssa Bresnahan
Published by HarperAudio on April 29, 2008
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Format: Audiobook
Length: 10 hours, 9 minutes
Source: Library
Amazon | Audio | B&N | Goodreads
three-half-stars

Rule #3: Don't stare at invisible faeries.
Aislinn has always seen faeries. Powerful and dangerous, they walk hidden in the mortal world. Aislinn fears their cruelty - especially if they learn of her Sight - and wishes she were as blind to their presence as other teens.

Rule #2: Don't speak to invisible faeries.
Now faeries are stalking her. One of them, Keenan, who is equal parts terrifying and alluring, is trying to talk to her, asking questions Aislinn is afraid to answer.

Rule #1: Don't ever attract their attention.
But it's too late. Keenan is the Summer King, who has sought his queen for nine centuries. Without her, summer itself will perish. He is determined that Aislinn will become the Summer Queen at any cost — regardless of her plans or desires.

Suddenly none of the rules that have kept Aislinn safe are working anymore, and everything is on the line: her freedom; her best friend, Seth; her life; everything.

Faery intrigue, mortal love, and the clash of ancient rules and modern expectations swirl together in Melissa Marr's stunning twenty-first-century faery tale.

Icon Library Book   Icon Young Adult   icon fantasy

I listened in preparation for NOLA Storycon. There is every reason I would not like Wicked Lovely; it’s young adult. I’m not sure yet if the classification is urban fantasy or paranormal romance since this is the first in the Wicked Lovely series. The first book always has possible world-building issues. There were some but not as many since it is about the fae but Aislinn is not fae and has some misconceptions. There weren’t an overwhelming amount of details for this reason. I learned slowly along with her.

I had trouble getting started listening, trying a couple times and couldn’t get going and then, I did. The narrator, Alyssa Bresnahan, must have done well because I was able to focus on the story with no disruptions from the narration. Her voice was easy to understand.

The young adult, high school thing, is SO high school. They really end up more like new adults which is an improvement. Most high school students would not have quite the freedom Aislinn does. It felt like forever to start to feel the characters and it seems like there should be more. And they just went on about what they wanted over and over without any change or resolution for awhile.

Aislinn has preconceived ideas about fae which are more than most know but less than the reality. I certainly understood Aislinn having a role she didn’t want but sometimes she also felt like a wishy-washy brat.  She kept looking for things to be the way she wanted, without always considering others. She did have some strength and compassion though. Yes, Keenan was old-fashioned and single-minded but I felt for him and his situation. It ain’t easy being King. (Sons of Anarchy reference)  I did love Aislinn telling him she had no interest in him initially. Poor Donia has really had a rough road and she was strong with morals anyway.  Seth is the most patient guy and awesome boyfriend material. Which is probably why I like Keenan.

This sort of is the love quadrangle which makes me uneasy.  The ending was well done for now, but I always ship the wrong couple and this is still true.  The story is not really focused on the romance as much as politics. The politics are making all things difficult for everyone. We only get the barest introduction to the fae, primarily summer and winter but hints of much more.

I loved meeting Melissa Marr at NOLA Storycon. She is just awesome.

MMarrMe

In spite of so many things I normally dislike (I probably need to rethink my knee-jerk I don’t like that stereotypes), I really liked and enjoyed this. It made me feel things. I have been told, not by her, the rest of the series just gets better. I was reading on anyway, and hope for more development of these characters as well as new ones. The events may mean many interesting changes in the fae world.

 

About Alyssa Bresnahan

Whether the work is contemporary fiction or young adult literature, Alyssa Bresnahan’s performances sing with a vibrancy reflecting her keen understanding of the text. For the seven years she has been working in audiobooks, she has delivered some difficult works, like Carol Shields’s Pulitzer Prize-winning THE STONE DIARIES, with consummate skill. She can tease out textual nuances and give listeners a clear window to the author’s vision.

In preparing to record a book, Alyssa tries to understand the rhythm of each author. Using an analogy that reflects her dancer’s training, she says, “I want to figure out the choreography of each author’s sound.” Recorded Books producer Claudia Howard remarks on Alyssa’s success with young adult titles. “She has a great comedic sense and an ability to convey a wide-eyed discovery of the world that just connects with that audience.” Narrating the recent recording of WHITE OLEANDER, Alyssa marveled at author Janet Fitch’s ability to paint a whole picture with one sentence. Alyssa sees herself–her voice–as a paintbrush delivering a picture to the listener. Good writing always gives the narrator more to work with, but Alyssa notes a paradox: “The better the writing is, the more you can leave it alone.”

About Melissa Marr

Melissa grew up believing in faeries, ghosts, and other creatures. After teaching college literature and writing for a decade, she applied her fascination with folklore to writing her own books.

Melissa writes fiction for adults, teens, and children. Her books have been translated into 28 languages to date and been bestsellers in the US (NY Times, LA Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal) as well as various countries overseas. She is best known for the Wicked Lovely series for teens and Graveminder for adults.

Wicked Lovely was her first novel; it was simultaneously released in the US and UK by HarperCollins in 2007 (with translation rights also sold in twenty-some countries). It debuted as a NY Times Bestseller and evolved into a multi-book series with myriad accolades and international bestseller lists.

Her debut adult book, Graveminder, released to strong critical reception in 2011. Following that she has edited anthologies with Kelley Armstrong (Enthralled and Shards & Ashes) and with Tim Pratt (Rags & Bones), and released a second adult novel (The Arrivals) in 2013.

With Kelley Armstrong, Melissa is the co-author of the Blackwell Pages trilogy (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers), a children’s trilogy about the Norse myth of Ragnarök. Loki’s Wolves released in 2013; it was followed by Odin’s Ravens in 2014 and Thor’s Serpents in May 2015.

Her HarperCollins 2014 release, Made For You, utilizes both her graduate degree in Southern Literature and her personal experience with stalkers in a story about a killer who terrorizes a small North Carolina town.

Her first picture book (Bunny Roo, I Love You) was released in April 2015. It was written while she was in the hospital with her baby, who was very sick. Her second picture book, Baby Dragon, Baby Dragon!, will release in 2017. Both picture books are with Penguin/Nancy Paulsen Books.

Under the name Ronnie Douglas, Melissa has written several adult romances as well– the self-published Unlawful, as well as Undaunted and Unruly (via HarperCollins).

2016 brought the release of her newest YA book, ​Seven Black Diamonds, which is the first in a new two-book faery series. (It has no relation whatsoever to the Wicked Lovely series.) The sequel, One Blood Ruby, releases in 2017.

Currently, Melissa resides in Arizona.